Where I’m From Poem

Since April is National Poetry Month, we always make many poems in class. This year, everyone in the grade is doing a “Where I’m From” poem. A “Where I’m From” poem is a poem about where you’re from, but not in a literal way. For example, you wouldn’t say you address, you would say an object or memory from your past. To make the poem more interesting, you could personify some of the things in your poem. For example, instead of saying “the window near the street,” you could say “the window looking out on the street.” That is personification, because you made the window sound like a person. When we think of things looking out, we think of people.

This is my “Where I’m From” poem:

Along with my poem, I made a short movie to go along with it. Included are pictures and a voiceover of me reciting the poem. This is it:

My Ignite Presentation

At school, I had to do an Ignite Presentation. An Ignite Presentation is a presentation that is ninety seconds. There are seven slides, an intro, five picture slides, and a conclusion. The first and last slides are called burn slides because the in the beginning and the end, you don’t have the audience’s full attention. The main rule in an Ignite Presentation, is that it has to tell a story.

I decided to do my Ignite on the most recent storm. I chose this because it was the only thing that was fresh in my mind, and since I lost power, I thought that it would be an interesting story.

The assignment was to make a presentation with pictures and a script in a week. You had to memorize your script for the final presentation. I thought that it would be really hard. On the day of the presentation, I was really nervous, but I thought that I did well.

This is my Ignite Presentation:

Debate

My debate group and I were debating whether we should protect humans from sharks or sharks from humans. The kids in my group were William, Will, and Eli. Will and Eli were partners and William and I were partners.

The first thing we did was read articles about either topic. Later we decided who was supporting what topic. Will and Eli were supporting protecting humans from sharks, and William and I were supporting protecting sharks from humans. Even though some of us had different topics, we all thought that we should protect sharks from humans.

Each partnership took lots of notes and annotated articles. Then, later we wrote an essay about our topic to help us with our oral debate. We practiced and practiced. Even though we were against each other, we knew all the evidence of both sides so we could come up with a good rebuttal.

On the day of our oral debate we were very nervous. We weren’t sure if we were ready or not. I think that we did well and here it is:

This is our self-assessment on how we did: