Capstone Blog Post #2

The next step in my capstone project is doing an interview with someone that knows a lot about my topic. I was having a lot of trouble finding someone. I tried like 15 people, not exaggerating and it was the night before my deadline to find someone to interview and I found someone just in time. I was so relieved. Her name is Janice Cooper and she was a competition director for the gymnastics Olympics in 1984, 1996, and 2008. This was really good for me because my main inquiry question is about how the judging and scoring evolved over time and that is exactly what she could answer so that was really good. 

I had twelve questions. They were:

 

1.What was your role and responsibilities in the Olympics?

 

  1. What were some of the main differences that you saw between the two Olympics that you worked at?

 

  1. How has the process of judging and scoring in the gymnastics Olympics evolved over time?

 

  1. How do the judges know what to focus on?

 

  1. How do the judges know when to take away points and how many to take away?

 

  1. How are the scores determined for each gymnast’s routine?

 

  1. What problems has the scoring system caused to gymnasts?

 

  1. What happens if the judges come across a tie?

 

  1. What do you like most about your job?

 

  1. What was the most challenging or frustrating thing about your job working at the Olympics?

 

  1. How do the gymnasts handle their stress?

 

  1. Is there additional information that you would like to share with me that you think would be helpful?

 

We went back and forth a couple of times to find a time that worked for both of us. But eventually, we found a time over the weekend that worked for both of us. I was really happy with the person that I found.

 

One of the questions that I asked her was my main inquiry question. I decided to ask her because I didn’t know what she was going to know and she actually had a lot to say about this question. A sub-question that she really helped me with was sub-questions 1 and 5. (the first and last one) Something that she taught me that was really interesting was that every year, the judges are tested so the people that are testing them can see what level that person should judge. 

 

Overall, my interview was a huge success. I think that the information that she gave me will really put my project over the top! She was the jackpot!

Capstone Blog Post #1

The topic that I am doing for Capstone is the gymnastics Olympics. My main inquiry question is, how has the process of judging and scoring in the Gymnastics Olympics evolved over time? 

Some things that were helpful in choosing my main inquiry question was my teachers one on one support, digging deeper, and not making my topic so broad. These things were helpful because when I met one on one with my teacher, she gave me the suggestion of a main inquiry question and I ended up using something really close to what she helped me come up with. 

One of the things that was challenging in the process of choosing my main inquiry question was narrowing down my question to be a little bit easier to research. At first, my main inquiry question was going to be about the entire Olympics but then I narrowed it down to just the Gymnastics Olympics and I think it is much easier. 

After I thought of my main inquiry question, I had to start thinking about my sub-questions. I had to think of five of them. Some of the ones that I thought of were, how do the judges know what to focus on when they are judging, and how do the judges know when to take away points and how many to take away. And three more. Some of the first sub-questions that I have didn’t stay. I ended up tweaking them a little throughout the process so they would be easier to research. 

Something that I have learned about myself as a learner is that if you want to accomplish your goal, you have to stay focused, and not overload yourself with too much to do. That is how you can be successful and learn a lot.

keep running

In late September, class 5C took the mile run. It went something like this. First, every member of the class chose a partner and got a sheet of paper. Then, everyone went outside to the basketball court/field. A lot of people are really nervous about this extreme run. Since the class was in partnerships, these partners had to choose who was going first and who was going second. Was that was decided, the first set went to the start line. The gym teacher Mr. Borja started the timer. “123 GO” he screamed. And just like that, they were off. Every time someone hit the start Mr. Borja called out that time and the partner not running and they write it down. These amazing runners had to run 10 laps around the basketball court and black top. When the tenth lap was up, it was time to switch. As you can see, all the members of the mile run are exhausted. Hopefully, something like this will never occur again. 

Halloween at Heathcote

Rain. On Halloween it rained. Everyone thought Halloween was ruined but some people knew that rain would not stop them from having the best Halloween ever. Since it was raining, Heathcote schools principal Ms. Stile held the Halloween parade inside. The whole school gathered in the auditorium and she started. It went something like this: first the whole school sang the Pledge of Allegiance and then sang the national anthem after that, the music teacher Ms. Bescherer lead the school in the school song and a few other songs that Heathcote school sings at assemblies. After that, all the teachers came up to the stage. This year at Heathcote, the theme for the teachers costume was the Wizard of Oz. So once they were all up on the stage, they sang Over the Rainbow and the whole school sang along.  Then came the moment all of Heathcote school was waiting for, the parade. The kindergarten went first, the first grade went second and so on. According to Hana a member of class 5C “the parade was better inside. It was a lot more fun.” All the grades had really unique costumes and not on purpose, Mrs. Cooper and had the same costume. Dorthy from the Wizard of Oz. 

Designing and Building Rocket #2

For designing and building rocket 2, we could only change one thing so our group decided to change the shape of our fins. We didn’t copy any of the other groups fins but we did take the groups fins that went highest and combined them together and made a great fin. We did the same body and nose cone but changed the way we added the tape. Instead of doing a yellow piece of paper and a red and yellow tape spiral, we did a black body with yellow ring of tape around it. I think it is going to go higher because there is less tape and smaller fins so there is less weight. I hope that it will go higher this time. Last time, our rocket did not go that high so this time, after experiences, maybe it will go higher!

Designing and Building Rocket #2

For designing and building rocket 2, we could only change one thing so our group decided to change the shape of our fins. We didn’t copy any of the other groups fins but we did take the groups fins and combined them together and made a great fin. We did the same body and nose cone but changed the way we added the tape. Instead of doing a yellow piece of paper and a red and yellow tape spiral, we did a black body with yellow ring of tape around it. I think it is going to go higher because there is less tape and smaller fins so there is less weight. I hope that it will go higher this time. Last time, our rocket did not go that high so this time, after experiences, maybe it will go higher!

Launching Rocket #1

Today is 10-4-19 and today is the day that class 5C launched there rockets.

There are 6 groups. The Astro-rockets, The 4 Rocketeers, The Three Musketeers, The Astros, and The Shooting Stars (my group). 

We all went outside to the field and Mrs. Cooper set up the launch pad. The first group was the Astros. They all put on their safety goggles and the air pumpers put the air in the rocket and then the countdown master counted down from ten and then the launcher pushed the button and the rocket went up. There were 4 clinometer readers because the sun could be in someone’s eyes and they would not get a good reading. There were also 2 people taking videos and recording the countdown and launch. This routine went for all of the groups.

The next day, we took the average height of the rocket, transferred it into feet and added the average height of a fifth grader. then, we wrote the data down on a piece of paper, we put our groups rocket with it and everyone walked around and looked at the other groups data. 

Designing and Building Rocket #1

Designing and building our first rocket had its pros and cons. First was the designing.

We made an inspiration board to help us see what we needed to do. We had to make a nose cone, a body, and fins. We had to decide what shape the fins were going to be, what size body, and what shape nose cone. One of the cons of doing this is that we all have to agree on the stuff to put on the rocket. This is a project all about working together and communicating. The steps to building the rocket are first, we have to take a PVC pipe and wrap a piece of paper around it to make the body then use electrical tape to wrap the body in the colors we want and to make sure it stays secure.

Then, we had to decide on the shape of the fins. Hana and I wanted one shape and Mark and Asher had another idea so we had to come up with a fin that combined all of our ideas into one fin shape.

Then came the nose cone. We all cut out a circle and cut one line to the middle and folded it. It turns into a shape that looks like a party hat. Then, we had to attach the nose cone to the top of the rocket and the fins around the bottom. We did four fins. Our group name is the shooting stars and the colors of our rocket is red and yellow.

20 Facts on the Stamp Act

  1. The Stamp Act was passed by the British Parliament on March 22, 1765.
  2. The new tax was imposed on all American colonists and required them to pay a tax on every piece of printed paper they used.
  3. Ship’s papers, legal documents, licenses, newspapers, other publications, and even playing cards were taxed.
  4. The tax applied to all legal documents, such as contracts, licenses, deeds, diplomas, and ship clearance papers. It also applied to pamphlets, newspapers, playing cards, advertisements, and dice.
  5. In order to purchase these items, a person had to also purchase a tax stamp that was embossed on (or attached to) the item.
  6. Any legal documents that did not have a stamp were considered invalid. If anyone distributed documents without the proper stamp, they could be fined.
  7. They passed this law because they had to raise money after the French and Indian War
  8. On May 29, 1765, the Virginia legislature adopted resolutions stating that only the Virginia legislature itself could tax Virginians.
  9. These Virginia Resolutions were written and introduced to the legislature by Patrick Henry.
  10. After they were adopted, the resolutions were published in many colonial newspapers.
  11. They inspired widespread colonial resistance to the tax.
  12. When they heard about it, the colonists were vehemently opposed to the new tax.
  13. According to the act, the money raised from the tax was supposed to be used for the protection and defense of the American colonies.
  14. However, the colonists suspected that Parliament planned to spend the money on defense for England, not the colonies.
  15. The colonists were also angry because they did not believe Parliament should be allowed to impose a tax on the colonies without their consent.
  16. Although resented, the Sugar Act tax was hidden in the cost of import duties, and most colonists accepted it.
  17. The Stamp Act, however, was a direct tax on the colonists and led to an uproar in America over an issue that was to be a major cause of the Revolution: taxation without representation.
  18. And for and upon every pack of playing cards, and all dice, which shall be sold or used within the said colonies and plantations, the several stamp duties following (that is to say):

  19. For every pack of such cards, one shilling.

  20. And for every pair of such dice, ten shillings.